Obesity has been determined by Scientists as being a potential factor which may raise the risk of severe Covid symptoms. Since this evidence has emerged the UK government has announced new ways to help tackle the obesity crisis.

 

The Government has decided that they will start to crack down on Alcoholic companies by considering that they are required to add Calorie information to their drinks. Coincidently I was only myself thinking a few weeks ago at how bizarre it was that drinks containing alcohol did not already do this. I picked up a can of pre-prepared Gin & tonic in a supermarket and looked to see what the calorie/sugar content, shockingly no information was given. Apparently for those who drink alcohol, on average 10% of the calories they consume comes from alcohol{1}. To me it’s only obvious that alcoholic drinks need to be labelled just the same as any other food & drinks. So far this is just an idea from the Government but if passed it could become enforced by the end of the year. Hopefully the new strategy will allow us all to make wiser decisions when choosing our next tipple!

 

Other strategies to help make us to eat better include removing special offers and promotions on sugary, salty and high fat junk foods. I don’t know about you but I don’t think I’ve ever come across buy one get one free offers in the fruit & veg isle. Maybe that should be a new thing to help us all get the 5-a day in. Anyway.. by removing these promotions this may even help you save the pennies as BOGOF deals have been shown to increase our spend by almost 20% {2}. A great initiative to help our bank balances and waist line.

If you would like to read the full report you can do so here: Tackling Obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives.

 

Make our Homemade sugar-free Rhubarb Gin here

 

  1. Public Health England. (2014) National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Results from Years 1-4 (combined) of the Rolling Programme (2008/09-2011/1
  2. Sugar Reduction: The evidence for action Annexe 4: An analysis of the role of price promotions on the household purchases of food and drinks high in sugar (Oct 2015)

 

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